Saturday, November 24, 2018

Received at the Library

In Your genealogy today (Sept./Oct. 2018) Robbie Gorr makes a good case for genealogy research being akin to "Opening Pnadora's box" -- you may uncover secrets that you or others are reluctant to hear, especially with the addition of DNA to your toolkit.  In "Shades of Gray" Sue Lisk suggests ways of thinking about where best to put your efforts in dealing with the uncertainties of family research.  An article on tools explains how possessing a tool shed belonging to your ancestor, or an inventory of an estate sale, can shed light on your forebear's life. Did you have ancestors involved in vaudeville or the circus?  If so take a look at Richard Goms' article in this issue for useful sources.  A case study on manumission (freeing of slaves) reveals that it sometimes took years to take effect.

Sue Lisk is also a contributor to Internet genealogy (Aug./Sept.2018), suggesting using historical cartoons to understand the social and political climate of your ancestors' lives.  Two articles focus on the virtues of newspaper research.  In April 2018 the Virtual Genealogical Society was founded.  At $20 annual membership, it offers frequent webinars (listed in the article), discounts on genealogical tools, social media opportunities, state chapters, and topical interest groups; a virtual conference will be held in Nov. 2019. A brief article also describes the online genealogical society Quebec Genealogical eSociety -- is this the future of genealogy?  A collection at North Dakota State University on Germans from Russia highlights the migrations that took place into and then out of Russia during the 18th ad 19th centuries by German immigrants. Merriam-Webster has a new service that sets words and expressions in context.  You can search Time Traveler by year or by a word or term to find the first use -- what fun!  (A small selection from my birth year of 1948: chili dog, linguine, oddball, scaredy-cat and transistor!) https://www.merriam-webster.com/time-traveler/